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The Toronto Educator’s Conference

Brain-Based Learning, Behavioural Challenges, & Student Mental Health

Presented by John T. Almarode, Ph.D. and Meghan Barlow, Ph.D. and Peg Dawson, Ed.D., NCSP and Steven G. Feifer, D.Ed., ABSNP and George McCloskey, Ph.D. and Kathy Morris, M.Ed. and Rebecca Moyes, M.Ed. and Steven T. Olivas, Ph.D., HSP and Eboni Webb, Psy.D. and Martha S. Burns, Ph.D. and Christine Dargon, Ph.D.

Tuesday, April 30, 2019 – Thursday, May 2, 2019  |  Toronto, on


Download Brochure (.PDF)

Date & Location

Tuesday, April 30, 2019 – Thursday, May 2, 2019

9:00am – 4:00pm

Sheraton Toronto Airport Hotel & Conference Centre

801 Dixon Rd
Toronto, ON
M9W 1J5

phone:  416.675.6100

 Full map & directions


11 Internationally Renown Experts

11 FULL DAY WORKSHOPS


A Letter from Jack Hirose

 

Dear Colleague,

I am pleased to announce the Toronto Educator’s Conference: Brain-Based Learning, Behavioural Challenges, & Mental Health will be hosted in Toronto, Ontario on April 30 – May 2, 2019. Over the past six years, our conferences for educators have trained over 5,000 education professionals. Whether you are attending for the first time or take part in this conference every year, all of us here at Jack Hirose and Associates would like to extend a warm welcome!

We have assembled your feedback and introduced a variety of new topics relevant to educators including: neuropsychology of reading & written language disorder, practical classroom management strategies, what to do after the meltdown, using CBT in dealing with anxiety disorders in school-age children, invigorate the student brain in science and math, interventions for executive functions, and much more!

We always strive to improve our training with the goal of our participants meeting or exceeding their personal learning objectives. This conference promises to offer you new skills, new techniques and new strategies to help keep you motivated and excel with your students. We firmly believe that we have assembled one of our strongest guest speaker line-ups in our company’s 20 year history. Please mark this event on your calendar, and I look forward to seeing you at the conference!

Jack Hirose, M.A.

Conference Director


Testimonials

“We are very happy with the information acquired during this conference! I gained many insights about my complex students and will return to my class with more empathy + understandings as to why they may behave the way they do. Excellent resources – loved when the powerpoints were provided to us. Great to follow along with.”

“The conference presentations gave a lot of valuable and important information. The momentum of presentations kept interest.”

“Wonderful, helpful and interesting information. Wish I could have done all 3 days!”

“The topics were relevant to the work that I do everyday.”

“Well organized conference. Great speakers.”

“Very helpful to add to my work as a school counsellor.”

“Thank you so much for the experience! Everyone was very accommodating and efficient!”

“It is great to have these conferences! Would recommend it to others!”


Who Should Attend

Education and Clinical Professionals: K–12 Classroom Teachers, School Counsellors/Psychologists, Learning Assistance/ Resource Teachers, School Administrators, School Paraprofessionals including Special Education Assistants, Classroom Assistants and Childcare Workers. All other professionals who support students including but not limited to: Nurses, Social Workers, Psychologists, Clinical Counsellors, Family Therapists, Occupational Therapists, Speech Language Pathologists, Addiction Counsellors, Youth Workers, Mental Health Workers, Probation Officers, and Early Childhood Educators.

Parents, Caregiver, Foster Parents, Grandparents, and Extended Family raising a child.

 


Agenda

 


 


Day One – April 30, 2019


Workshop #1: Captivate, Activate & Invigorate the Student Brain in Science & Math
Presented by John T. Almarode, Ph.D.

9:00am - 4:00pm   April 30, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Getting students engaged in learning and keeping them engaged is one of the toughest challenges in today’s science and mathematics classrooms. So how do we do it? How do we get our students to the edge of their seats for new science and math learning? Recent brain research confirms what we as teachers have believed for years, we don’t pay attention to boring things. This exciting, out of your seat workshop looks at the key “must have” ingredients for maximum engagement in your middle and secondary science classroom. Participants start with captivating students and discovering what grabs the brain’s attention, making it thirsty for new learning. Then, experience the necessary steps to activating the brain so that it’s “rocking and rolling” in the classroom. Finally, keeping the brain engaged requires an invigorating experience that keeps students coming back for more…every day! This amazing workshop links the most recent research on keeping the brain engaged in the science and math content. Participants will walk away, raring to go, with instant ideas and strategies that will have every student captivated, activated, and invigorated!

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COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1.   Participants will be able to describe the brains role in engaging students in science and math.
  2. Participants will be able to identify the necessary conditions for engaging students in science and math.
  3. Participants will be able to define the three types of student engagement and the role each plays in the science and math classroom.
  4. Participants will be able to describe the recipe for engagement in science and math.
  5. Participants will be able to apply the recipe to science and math instruction in grades 6 – 12.
  6. Participants will be able to list the barriers to engagement in science and math.
  7. Participants will be able to develop a list of strategies associated with each part of the recipe for engagement.
  8. Participants will be able to create an action plan for implementing ideas and strategies into their individual science and math classrooms.

COURSE OUTLINE:

  • A recipe for engagement.
  • What does engagement have to do with it?
  • The Science of Learning and Student Engagement.
  • Building background knowledge.
  • Activating prior knowledge.
  • Captivate with novelty.
  • Strategies for building background knowledge, activating prior knowledge, and using novelty.
  •  Establishing relevancy.
  • Managing the pace of instruction.
  • Invigorating the learner for long-lasting learning.
  • Barriers to engaging the learner and how to overcome those barriers.
  • Strategies for establishing relevancy, managing the pace of instruction, invigorating the brain, and overcoming barriers.
  • An action plan for engaging learners in science and math.
John T. Almarode, Ph.D.

John T. Almarode, Ph.D., has presented locally, nationally, and internationally. He has worked with thousands of teachers, dozens of school districts, and countless organizations. John actively pursues his research interests including educational neuroscience, the design and measurement of classroom environments that promote…

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Workshop #2: Dealing with Anxiety Disorders in School-Age Children
Presented by Christine Dargon, Ph.D.

9:00am - 4:00pm   April 30, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The increasing rate of stress and trauma to children, which includes divorce, family breakdown, violence in society, the media, and a failing school system, has produced a “shell shocked” generation suffering from anxiety in many cases. The challenge for educators and clinicians is to recognize anxiety in children and help them cope. Dr. Christine Dargon will teach you how and why anxiety develops in children and adolescents. She will present practical treatment strategies that can be applied immediately.
The seven key anxiety disorders along with case examples to be addressed include: 
  • Separation Anxiety Disorder
  • Overanxious Disorder
  • Social Anxiety Disorder
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Panic Disorder
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
  • Phobias

Other co-occurring disorders (e.g. behaviour problems, medical conditions, depression, ADHD, learning disabilities, selective mutism) will also be discussed. Emphasis will be on creative interventions involving insight- oriented, cognitive-behavioural, biological, mindfulness, expressive arts and family systems approaches.

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COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Demonstrate how to apply the “Three Ingredients” template for understanding how, why and when anxiety develops in children
  2. Describe how to recognize and modify the sources of stress in children and adolescents
  3. Explain the anxiety management skills to use with young clients
  4. Identify effective treatment strategies for each of the seven key anxiety disorders
  5. Identify steps that schools can take to reduce student anxiety

 

COURSE OUTLINE:

Nature and Causes of Anxiety

  • How anxiety develops in children
  • Three ingredients in all anxiety disorders
  • The “anxiety personality” –– assets and liabilities

Seven Key Anxiety Disorders

  • Separation anxiety disorder
  • Panic disorder
  • Overanxious disorder
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • Social anxiety disorder
  • Phobias
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder

Co-Occurring Disorders

  • Depression
  • ADHD
  • Learning Disabilities
  • Selective mutism

Therapeutic Approaches

  • Cognitive-behavioural
  • Biological
  • Mindfulness
  • Expressive Arts
  • Family Systems Approaches

Interventions and Self-Regulation Strategies

  • The Floating Technique for panic anxiety
  • Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) for OCD
  • Mindfulness for worry
  • Solution Focused Intervention for worry
  • Group therapy guidelines for social anxiety
  • Visualization Desensitization for separation anxiety
  • Three Questions Technique for parents struggling with child separation anxiety
  • Three Step Technique for managing children’s stress
  • Yoga games and breathing techniques for relaxation training
  • LifeSkills Program for generalized Anxiety
  • Virtual Reality approach for phobias
  • Baby Buddhas meditations for anxious preschoolers
Christine Dargon, Ph.D.

Christine Dargon, Ph.D., having worked in clinical practice for over 20 years, now focuses her time on speaking and education. Her areas of clinical expertise include working with children and families for years in such areas as abuse, divorce and…

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Workshop #3: Over 30 Proven & Effective Brief Interventions for Students with Emotional & Behavioural Problems
Presented by Steven T. Olivas, Ph.D., HSP

9:00am - 4:00pm   April 30, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Leaving nothing to the abstract, 75 Quick, “On-the- Spot” Techniques for Children with Emotional and Behavioural Problems will guide you through focused, clear, and successful methods for treating children. Every teacher who seeks to fill their toolbox with tested methods will leave with a wealth of fresh ideas. If you do not have a lot of experience working with children and teens, you will leave with a defined strategy for success. If you are a seasoned professional, you will learn new tricks and techniques to re-energize and vitalize yourself as a teacher! With over 25 years of clinical experience and a background in improvisational comedy, Dr. Steve is a strong proponent of “Edu-tainment.” Namely, he uses charm, wit and humour to enhance the workshop experience, thus improving the retention and utilization of the specific skills covered. We change the world when we touch a child’s life!

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COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Utilize effective, proven techniques for individually treating children with behaviour problems

  2. Learn simple, teachable tools specific for parents and teachers

  3. Hone skills for building a therapeutic relationship with difficult children and teens

COURSE OUTLINE:

Behavioural Overview

Etiology nature v. nurture

  • gender differences
  • hormonal influence

Medical Interventions/Medications ADHD

  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder
  • Conduct Disorder
  • Bi-Polar Disorder

Tools for Helping Behaviour Problem Children

Quick Techniques to Manage Anger

  • Time in!
  • Restitution

Quick Techniques to Manage Depression

  • Cut n paste

Quick Techniques to Manage Anxiety

  • Ceiling fan breathing
  • Set the clock

Quick Techniques to Manage Autism Spectrum

  • Facial expressions and social cues
  • Building a broader structure

Techniques to help the Client’s World

Parents/Caregivers

  • Concrete behavioural interventions in the home
  • The Listening Jar
  • Red Light/Green Light

Teachers/School Systems

  • Immediate relief in the classroom
  • Token Economies/Response Cost
Steven T. Olivas, Ph.D., HSP

Steven T. Olivas, Ph.D., HSP, is a Licensed Psychologist in Private Practice in Middle Tennessee. He began his practice career in 1991 when ADHD was exploding onto the scene, and has enjoyed working with the energy and spontaneous creativity of children ever…

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Workshop #4: Life Skills: Practical Strategies that Work for Students with Severe Cognitive/Developmental Disorders, Autism, CP, & Syndromes
Presented by Kathy Morris, M.Ed.

9:00am - 4:00pm   April 30, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Students labeled as having moderate to significant cognitive/developmental disabilities may appear to have such challenging deficits that their educational needs are perceived as far exceeding their abilities. Their needs may appear so basic (e.g., simple communication skills, appropriate manipulation of objects, delayed cognitive abilities) that teaching these students in typical classrooms that are highly academic seems improbable or, at the least, impractical. Yet these are the very students who can benefit considerably from the learning opportunities that typically occur in general education classrooms (Downing and Eichinger, 2006). Special educators, no matter how highly motivated or skilled, cannot provide the ongoing stimulation in self-contained classrooms. This interactive, informative workshop targets those students who may have been “relegated” to a LIFE Skills program for the rest of their school career. Instead, a system is presented so that the critical components necessary for success for learning are created in a general education setting. The participants will leave with many “keys” for reaching their students‘ potential.

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COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Identify individual educational objectives that could be successfully met in the general education classroom
  2. Describe how to determine individual abilities and how to support students
  3. Demonstrate the ability to implement instructional supports starting with the most challenging inclusive strategies for middle school and high school students
  4. Identify critical program components at the middle school and high school levels
  5. Describe how to analyze a learning environment to accommodate students with severe and multiple impairments
  6. Describe how to implement strategies in an elementary school setting
  7. Create multi-level instruction which can be provided in the general education setting that incorporates state standards
  8. Determine in a systematic way which individual educational goals can be met in a general education classroom or may need to be implemented in a more restrictive environment.

COURSE OUTLINE:

  • Educational Objectives in the General Education Classroom
  • How to Determine Individual Abilities; Student Supports
  • IEPs and State Standards; Instructional Supports for Middle and High School Students
  • Critical Program Components at the Middle School and High School Levels
  • How to Analyze the Learning Environment to Accommodate Students with Severe and Multiple Impairments
  • How to Implement Strategies at the Elementary School Level
Kathy Morris, M.Ed.

Kathy Morris, M.Ed., has been a speech therapist, teacher for self-contained programs (including students with autism, severe behavioural difficulties, and cerebral palsy), resource teacher and first grade teacher. She was also a diagnostician/supervisor for all grade levels. She was a LIFE…

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Workshop #5: Reaching & Teaching Students with Emotional Disturbance
Presented by Rebecca Moyes, M.Ed.

9:00am - 4:00pm   April 30, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Students with emotional disturbance provide many challenges for educators. Knowing when to qualify a student for special education, as well as what goals and interventions to put in place, are often areas of concern. In cases where students have aggressive behaviours, special considerations are often necessary for their peers to feel safe in the classroom, as well as the adults that work with these students. Many students with emotional disturbance also struggle academically; in fact, sometimes the root of their disturbance stems from not having their academic needs met. Kids today are dealing with challenges within their families that many educators do not have experience with (example: drug and alcohol addiction, relationship stressors, criminal activity, trauma, and poverty). This workshop will provide awareness of emotional disturbance in the school setting, outline ways that schools can support this population, strategies to develop effective IEPs, and practical strategies to assist these students to learn replacement skills.

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COURSE OBJECTIVES: 

  1. List the three factors under IDEA to qualify a student for special education services under the category of emotional disturbance
  2. Describe various school services that can be provided for students as related services
  3. Discuss the functions of behaviour as they relate to emotional disturbance
  4. Write examples of IEP goals to teach replacement skills
  5. Write positive behaviour support plans to support difficult behaviours
  6. Design intervention strategies to address a student with aggressive behaviour
  7. List several ways to assist a student with stress and/or anger management

COURSE OUTLINE:

  • Description of emotional disturbance and IDEA; symptoms exhibited by students with emotional disturbance
  • Underlying factors that may contribute to a student’s disturbance in the school setting
  • Functions of behaviour
  • Related services and specially designed instruction for students with emotional disturbance
  • Interventions to address defiance, anger and stress management, and aggression
  • Writing the IEP and Positive Behaviour Support Plan
  • Case study – ideas for implementation
Rebecca Moyes, M.Ed.

Rebecca Moyes, M.Ed., is a former general education teacher in public and private schools. She has served on Pennsylvania Governor Ridge’s Task Force for Autism and was a member of the PA SAFE Project for Verbal Behaviour. She is the author…

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Day Two – May 1, 2019


Workshop #6: The Neuropsychology of Emotional Disorders: A Framework for Effective Interventions
Presented by Steven G. Feifer, D.Ed., ABSNP

9:00am - 4:00pm   May 1, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This workshop will explore the neural architecture of emotional behaviour by examining various brain structures laying the foundation for higher level social skill functioning. Specific biological factors related to the development of social competence and emotional self-regulation will be explored. There will be a detailed discussion on behavioural self-regulation, anxiety disorders, and depression from a brain-based educational perspective. Particular focus will be on factors leading to emotional dysregulation and the neurobiological underpinnings of stress. Schools can enhance emotional wellness in children through early prevention efforts, appropriate assessment strategies, and an improved school climate to foster emotional growth for all children.

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COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Discuss the relationship between emotional disorders and poor self regulation skills, bullying behaviour, and limited academic success in school
  2. Discuss the neural architecture of emotional functioning by examining six key brain regions responsible for behavioural self-regulation
  3. Explore the neurobiological correlates and treatment options for psychopathy and emotional dysregulation, depression, and anxiety disorders in children
  4. Present a treatment algorithm utilizing counseling, cognitive-behavioural therapy, parent training, and neurofeedback to promote emotional wellness in children
  5. Explore effective classroom interventions, treatment options, and assessment strategies for children with emotional self-regulation and conduct disorders

COURSE OUTLINE:

  • The coding conundrum for children with emotional disorders
  • Curbing bullying behaviour in our schools
  • Neural architecture of emotional regulation
  • Emotional disorders, behaviour and academic success
  • Treatment for anxiety, depression, and self regulation disorders
  • De-escalating behaviour and promoting social-emotional learning
  • Assessment of social-emotional disorders
Steven G. Feifer, D.Ed., ABSNP

Steven G. Feifer, D.Ed., ABSNP  is an internationally renowned speaker and author in the field of learning disabilities, and has authored seven books on learning and emotional disorders in children.  He was voted the Maryland School Psychologist of the Year…

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Workshop #7: Interventions for Executive Function Difficulties: Changing the Brain to Change Behaviour
Presented by George McCloskey, Ph.D.

9:00am - 4:00pm   May 1, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course will help participants gain a deeper understanding of executive functions and how executive functions deficits impact the behaviour and academic production of children and adolescents. Participants will gain state-of-the-art knowledge of how to identify executive function strengths and weaknesses and the most effective ways to help children and adolescents improve their use of executive functions. Ways to discuss executive functions with children, parents and other school staff will be offered as well as ways to help motivate adolescents to ensure their full participation in efforts to help them. Special emphasis will be placed on how to orient students to intervention efforts and help them move from being externally controlled to internally self-regulated through the use of bridging strategies. Case study examples of assessment and intervention efforts and outcomes with children and adolescents will be discussed throughout the presentation. Participants will leave this workshop energized and with a renewed sense of purpose, a greater knowledge of how to improve executive functions, and a greater realization of how they can have a positive effect on the children, parents and professionals with whom they work.

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COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Adequately describe a comprehensive model of executive functions
  2. Explain how executive function difficulties are manifested in individuals diagnosed with various psychological disorders and/or enrolled in special education programs
  3. Describe and apply strategies that use external control to help a student function more effectively in school settings
  4. Describe and apply strategies that enable students to improve their use internally self-regulated capacities to improve their functioning in school settings
  5. Describe and apply strategies that help students bridge the gap between being externally controlled and internally self-regulated
  6. Identify and access sources of information about evidence-based programs that foster executive function development and/or remediate difficulties

COURSE OUTLINE:

  • Executive functions: What they are and what they are not
  • A comprehensive model of executive functions; executive functions development; executive functions and clinical diagnoses
  • Internally commanded and externally demanded use of executive functions; motivation and executive functions; learning vs. producing: the nature of producing disabilities and how they are different from learning disabilities
  • Orienting strategies: increasing awareness of difficulties and setting goals for intervention
  • External control strategies for helping students improve functioning in school settings
  • Bridging strategies for helping students transition from externally controlled to internally self-regulated
  • Bridging strategies continued; strategies for strengthening internal self-regulation
George McCloskey, Ph.D.

George McCloskey, Ph.D., is a Professor and Director of School Psychology Research in the Psychology Department of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and holds Diplomate status with the American Academy of Pediatric Neuropsychology. He frequently presents at international and…

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More information: www.georgemccloskeyphd.com/



Workshop #8: Is It Disability Behaviour or Just Disruptive Behaviour?
Presented by Rebecca Moyes, M.Ed.

9:00am - 4:00pm   May 1, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Both educators and parents struggle with what to do with difficult behaviour in the classroom and home. Both are often hesitant to provide consequences when a child with special needs exhibits problem behaviours because they are afraid they will be accused of punishing him/her for symptoms that are related to his/her disability. In school settings, there are certain behaviours that are not permitted, and others that impede the child’s or the other students’ ability to learn. Knowing how to appropriately address behaviours is important because any behaviour that is reinforced (either accidentally or on purpose) is likely to continue or escalate. Children with disabilities often exhibit problems with motivation, transitions, task avoidance, sensory processing, social skills, anger, defiance, impulsiveness, and behavioural inhibition, among others. Many children with autism, Asperger’s, ADHD, emotional disturbance, oppositional defiant disorder, Down’s Syndrome, and learning disability exhibit these challenging behaviours. Behind every problem behaviour is something to teach to address a skill deficit and interventions that can help to stop the cycle of difficult behaviour. This full-day workshop will empower educators with practical and evidenced-based strategies to feel competent to appropriately address difficult behaviours associated with disabilities.

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COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Identify the use of positive vs. negative reinforcement and positive vs. negative punishment when given behavioural scenarios
  2. Describe ways to incorporate the use of reinforcement to decrease the frequency of problem behaviour
  3. List particular antecedent strategies to support difficult behaviour, including strategies for students with emotional disturbance and oppositional defiant disorder
  4. Describe the skill deficits that may be associated with problem behaviour and write appropriate IEP goals to address them
  5. Write positive behaviour support plans to teach new skills so that children will not use problem behaviour to achieve escape or attention
  6. Initiate the use of appropriate data collection tools to study behaviour objectively and learn what is reinforcing it

COURSE OUTLINE:

  • Difficulties presented by children with
    behavioral deficits and conflicts between
    staff and parents
  • Antecedents to difficult behavior;
    consequences: reinforcers and
    “punishers”
  • Functions of behaviour; types of data collection tools
  • Developing a PBSP based on data collection
  • Executive functions and how they impact problem behaviour
  • Interventions for motivation, transition difficulties, perseverations
  • Interventions for inflexibility, oppositional defiant behaviour, sensory disturbances, attention difficulties and emotional control

Workshop #9: What Is It About Me You Don’t Like? Practical Classroom Management Strategies that Help Minimize Challenging Behaviours
Presented by Kathy Morris, M.Ed.

9:00am - 4:00pm   May 1, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Quality indicators for an effective classroom include: teacher behaviour (tone of voice, volume, cadence, verbal and nonverbal communication, para verbals), environment (physical structure, schedules, routines, expectations), instruction (boring vs. stimulating, age appropriate vs. non-age appropriate, hands-on), and student behaviour (function of behaviour attention, power, revenge, avoidance). This workshop is based on current research that supports how the brain responds to these indicators, especially when a student is in crisis, as well as current research on mental health. This is not a “sit and get” workshop. Demonstrations, real life videos, practice, sharing, movement and time for reflection will be provided.

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COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Identify target behaviours that are developmental and will most likely go away vs behaviours that will most likely continue to get worse over time
  2. Identify effective communication strategies from ineffective ones in order to minimize undesirable behaviours
  3. Demonstrate the ability to design a classroom that promotes goals of intended instruction for different areas of the room
  4. Demonstrate the ability to design stimulating lessons that engage diverse learners
  5. Adequately demonstrate power struggle avoidance techniques with students exhibiting challenging behaviours
  6. Identify the functions of a student’s behaviour by focusing on one’s own reaction to the behaviour
  7. Describe how to troubleshoot breakdowns in your own classroom, school or therapy environment
  8. Identify 3 visual tools you can use to help minimize disruptive behaviours

COURSE OUTLINE:

  • Targeting Diverse Learners in the Classroom – Who Are They? Why These Strategies are for ALL Students
  • Critical Components, Teacher Behaviour, Teaching the Way They Learn
  • Classroom Environment
  • Positive Behaviour Supports
  • Meaningful Instruction and Learning Strategies
  • Student Behaviour

Workshop #10: Rescuing the Dysregulated Child: Effective Interventions & Strategies with Children, Adolescents, & Parents
Presented by Eboni Webb, Psy.D.

9:00am - 4:00pm   May 1, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Working with emotionally dysregulated children is an often overwhelming and exhausting endeavour. Many teachers and counsellors feel the pull of being “saviours” for dysregulated children and their parents. How to intervene and steps that can be taken by teachers and administrators will be presented. This training will enable participants to employ strategies in which teachers and parents can experience success through learning to reestablish structure, create a validating and secure environment, and increase compassion for all family members and care providers.

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Dr. Webb will additionally address key childhood disorders that left untreated can lead to maladaptive coping behaviours in adulthood. Dr. Webb will teach participants how to apply and adapt various skills training to reflect the language of children and how to establish a safe and supportive classroom in which children can learn and generalize these skills. Working with emotionally-dysregulated children in your classroom can be overwhelming and exhausting. You probably feel the pull of being the “saviour” for dysregulated children and their worried parents. Learn how to implement the skills you need to be more effective in the classroom, avoid burnout and achieve positive outcomes.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Describe the biosocial model of pervasive emotional dysregulation disorders found in innately sensitive children.
  2. Utilize behaviour modification strategies at the earliest stage of dysregulation.
  3. Summarize the importance of structure in both skills training and home environments and how to teach parents or care providers to implement these strategies.
  4. Explain how to adapt each skills module to reflect the language of the child.
  5. Explain the role of educators, care providers, and parents and how to reestablish a safe and loving structure that enables the child to learn and generalize skills.

COURES OUTLINE:

Description of emotional disturbance and IDEA; symptoms exhibited by students with emotional disturbance

  • Biosocial Model
  • Attachment style
  • Impact of trauma

Adapt Dialectical Behaviour Skills Training to Key Childhood and Adolescent Disorders ADHD

  • Attachment Disorder
  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD)/Conduct Disorder (CD)
Eboni Webb, Psy.D.

Eboni Webb, Psy.D., earned her doctorate of clinical psychology from the Minnesota school of Professional Psychology (Argosy University) and is the owner of Kairos Mental Health Cooperative, LLC, which offers diverse DBT programming to children and adults. She continues to serve as an advisor to…

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More information: http://www.kairosmentalhealth.com/KMH/



Day Three – May 2, 2019


Workshop #11: The Neuropsychology of Reading & Written Language Disorders: A Framework for Effective Interventions
Presented by Steven G. Feifer, D.Ed., ABSNP

9:00am - 4:00pm   May 2, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This workshop will examine reading and written language disorders from a brain-based educational perspective, and classify both dyslexia and dysgraphia into distinct subtypes. There will be a detailed discussion linking each learning disorder’s subtype with scores of evidence-based interventions. Four universal truths when teaching reading will be shared, in addition to five essential steps for effective written language instruction. The use of neuropsychological assessment addressing multiple cognitive constructs that underscore literacy will be featured. For instance, the role of phonological processing, orthographic processing, working memory, language and motor skill development, and executive functioning will be discussed as being crucial for effective literacy skills to emerge. Lastly, the “90-minute” learning disorders evaluation highlighting the Feifer Assessment of Reading (FAR) battery will be introduced as a more effective means to both identify and remediate language-based learning disabilities in children.

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COURSE OBJECTIVE:

  1. Discuss current literacy rates in Canada and trends in reading achievement
  2. Differentiate “developmental dyslexia” from other learning disorders, and discuss how schools can best screen for early reading pitfalls in children
  3. Discuss four universal truths with respect to teaching reading based upon brain-behavioural principles
  4. Describe a brain-based educational model of reading and written language disorders by classifying each disability into basic subtypes, with specific remediation strategies linked to each subtype
  5. Discuss five essential steps for effective written language instruction
  6. Describe the 90 minute LD evaluation measuring eight core constructs associated with learning disorders in children, including the Feifer Assessment of Reading (FAR) battery

COURSE OUTLINE:

  • Discuss national trends in reading and literacy
  • Define “dyslexia” and main pitfalls of using solely IQ testing or Rtl to identify this condition
  • Four universal truths with respect to reading
  • Subtypes of reading disordered and interventions
  • An introduction to the FAR
  • DIscuss national trends in written language and gender differences in writing achievement
  • Discuss eight core cognitive constructs involved with written language development
  • Four main subtypes of written language disorders

Workshop #12: Smart But Scattered: Strengthening Executive Skills in Children and Adolesents
Presented by Peg Dawson, Ed.D., NCSP

9:00am - 4:00pm   May 2, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Executive function is a neuropsychological concept referring to the cognitive processes required to plan and direct activities. Skills include task initiation and follow through, working memory, sustained attention, performance monitoring, inhibition of impulses, and goal-directed persistence. While the ground-work for development of these skills occurs before birth, they develop gradually through the first two decades of life. But from the moment that children begin to interact with their environment, adults have expectations for how they will use executive skills to negotiate many of the demands of childhood – from the self-regulation of behaviour required to act responsibly, to the planning and initiation skills required to complete chores and homework. Parents and teachers expect children to use executive skills even though they may little understand what these skills are and how they impact behaviour and school performance. The importance of executive skills to overall cognitive functioning first became apparent in work with children and teenagers who had sustained traumatic brain injuries. Problems involving planning and organization, time management, and memory, as well as weaknesses with inhibition and regulation of emotions, have long described a significant component of traumatic brain injury. Executive skills have also assumed an important role in the explanation of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

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This workshop will begin by providing an overview of executive skills, including definitions and a description of the developmental progression of these skills in the first two decades of life. The approach to understanding executive skills presented in this workshop is structured around two key concepts: 1) that most individuals have an executive skills profile that includes both strengths and weaknesses; and 2) by defining executive skills discretely rather than grouping them in broader categories, it is possible to design interventions to address specific deficits that lend themselves to data-based decision making. Workshop participants will gain a deeper understanding both of the model being presented and of their own executive skills profile.

The heart of the workshop will address how to assess executive skills and develop interventions designed to address specific executive skill weaknesses.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Define executive skills and identify how executive skills impact school performance and daily living
  2. Use assessment tools to identify executive dysfunction
  3. Access a repertoire of strategies to improve executive skills in students
  4. Design your own intervention strategies tailored to the needs of individual students
  5. Utilize classroom-wide interventions to improve executive skills

COURSE OUTLINE: 

Part I: Overview of Executive Skills

  • Definitions
  •  Underlying theory
  • Executive skills in the context of brain function and child development

Part II: Assessment of Executive Skills

  • Parent/teacher/student interviews
  • Behaviour Rating Scales
  • Observations
  •  Informal Assessment
  • Formal Assessment

Part III: Three Intervention Strategies

  • Environmental modifications to reduce the impact of weak executive skills
  • Teaching strategies/routines to help youngsters develop/improve executive functioning
  • Using incentives to help youngsters practice or use skills that are difficult

Part IV: Coaching as an Effective Strategy for Building Executive Skills

  •  Overview of coaching
  • Description of 2-stage process
  • Coaching with younger children
  • Clinical case examples
  • Description of research studies
Peg Dawson, Ed.D., NCSP

Peg Dawson, Ed.D., NCSP received her doctorate in school/child clinical from the University of Virginia. She worked as a school psychologist for 16 years in Maine and New Hampshire, and, for the past 18 years has worked at the Center…

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Workshop #13: High Functioning Autism: Proven & Practical Interventions for Challenging Behaviours with Children & Adolescents
Presented by Meghan Barlow, Ph.D.

9:00am - 4:00pm   May 2, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This intensive, full-day workshop provides proven intervention strategies, essential treatment tools, and behavioural techniques to help you analyze behaviours and actions, identify consequences for behaviours, and teach new skills to children, adolescents and young adults with high-functioning autism (HFA). Walk away with practical intervention techniques for social success, behaviour changes and overcoming challenging co-occurring behaviours that deliver success through adulthood.

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The challenging co-occurring issues to be addressed are:

  • Social Skills Deficits
  • Communication Deficits
  • Sensory
  • Anxiety/Rigidity
  • Depression
  • Meltdowns, Outbursts, and Non-Compliance
  • ADHD & OCD
  • Psychotropic Medications

Gain valuable insight into how information processing, communication, and social skills deficits lead to difficulty in the home, school, occupational, and social settings. Learn how to prioritize a plan for intervention and implement strategies in order to improve functioning across all areas. We will explore HFA and the new DSM-5® diagnosis of Social- Pragmatic Communication Disorder. You will receive the necessary tools to gain effective collaboration between clinicians, educators and parents.

Through case studies, video clips and class participation you will leave this workshop with an improved understanding of HFA and the confidence to develop and implement effective treatment plans. Don’t just manage these individuals; provide interventions that lead to successful independence into their adult years!

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Explain how the DSM-5® updates impact service delivery
  2. Utilize several social skill interventions to improve long-term success for children/adolescents with HFA
  3. Employ specific coping and calming techniques for children/adolescents with HFA
  4. Identify medication side effects that can mimic behavioural issues and may even cause behavioural issues
  5. Design effective strategies for successful transitions for children/adolescents with HFA
  6. Select specific behavioural interventions that target the most difficult behaviours in children/ adolescents with HFA
  7. Summarize the new DSM-5® diagnosis of Social- Pragmatic Communication Disorder and design treatment interventions

COURSE OUTLINE:

DSM-5® and ICD-10 Updates

  • Social-Pragmatic Communication Disorder
  • Impact on service delivery (school/community)
  • Successfully link home, school and therapy
  • IEP/504/Do they qualify for school services?
  • Co-morbid disorders: Why the difference is important

Social Skills Interventions

  • Improve social skill deficits
  • “Kid Cop” behaviours and why other kids get angry
  • How to get peers to recognize them in positive ways
  • Group activities that have a proven track record

Communication Interventions

  • Help peers and family members relate
  • Verbal interventions that overload processing
  • The importance of incorporating visuals in communication
  • Pragmatic language and other abstract issues

Sensory Interventions

  • Self-stimulation
  • Coping/calming techniques that reduce meltdowns
  • Sensory diet

Anxiety Interventions

  • Anxiety-reducing activities
  • How anxiety impacts rigidity
  • Help them “self-regulate”
  • Successful transitions

Depression Interventions

  • Assessing for mood disorders
  • Therapy that works for people with HFA
  • Solitude vs. loneliness

ADHD Interventions

  • ADHD vs. hyper-focus
  • Commonly prescribed medications and possible benefits and side effects
  • Specific triggers and what fuels the rage
  • Reduce aggressive and disruptive behaviours
  • Mistakes that escalate defiant behaviours
  • Overcome refusals to comply with even simple requests

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Interventions

  • Differences between ASD and OCD
  • Specific medication interventions
  • Impact on socialization and behaviours
Meghan Barlow, Ph.D.

Meghan Barlow, Ph.D., is a licensed pediatric psychologist specializing in the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents and young adults on the autism spectrum. She also has a wide range of experience working with children who have a variety of anxiety…

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Workshop #14: What To Do After The Meltdown: Practical Strategies for Prevention, Intervention & Instructional Consequences
Presented by Kathy Morris, M.Ed.

9:00am - 4:00pm   May 2, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

When working with a child or adolescent with an Autism Spectrum Disorder, ADHD, or another developmental disorder, meltdowns may occur that may be a result of sensory overload or due to inability to self- regulate emotions. This workshop will provide many practical hands-on strategies to: increase positive and acceptable behaviour while decreasing undesirable behaviours; prevent meltdowns, tantrums, rages; provide suggestions for instructional consequences and self-management techniques to help prevent another meltdown; provide a system of visual supports throughout the day; demonstrate how to use high focus and interest areas as incentives; and, provide videos and demonstrations using evidence-based techniques. This information and fun-packed workshop is designed for educators, therapists, counsellors and all those who are interested in providing supports to children and adolescents with ASD, ADHD, or other developmental disabilities.

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COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Explain why an agenda/schedule is important for persons on the spectrum
  2. Explain how to use a Surprise Card or Change of Schedule Card in a clinical or classroom setting
  3. Differentiate between a meltdown and a tantrum
  4. Differentiate chronic over-arousal to behaviours observed in students with an ASD or another developmental disorder
  5. Demonstrate the ability to role-play a Social Script Adequately describe how to apply a Video Model
  6. Accurately identify examples of over-stimulation when presented with videotaped examples of student behaviours
  7. Discuss how to implement Power Cards and Social Stories in classroom or therapy settings

COURSE OUTLINE:

  • Use of Agenda/Schedules, Suprise Cards or Change of Schedule Cards
  • Meltdowns, Tantrums, Chronic Overarousal; Social Scripts
  • Video Models
  • Myths and Facts of ASD; Autism Research, Neurology of the Brain and Behaviour
  • Video of Overstimulation; How to Implement Power Cards and Social Stories
  • Video Scenarios-Critical Components in General Education Classrooms
  • Implementing Instructional Consequences; Using Visual Tools

Workshop #15: Neuroscience of Technology to Enhance Learning
Presented by Martha S. Burns, Ph.D.

9:00am - 4:00pm   May 2, 2019

TARGET AGE RANGE: Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

As Educators, we chose this career because we love teaching and work diligently to increase the effectiveness of our classroom instruction. But, at every level we encounter students who struggle to benefit from the best instruction and master the content.  Educational Neuroscience has recently been able to begin to clarify why some students struggle to learn. Whether because of environmental stressors like poverty or adverse childhood experiences (ACES), specific genetic brain maturational differences, perceptual variations, or other maturational brain differences,  new research has shown that students who struggle academically have underlying differences in learning capacities like memory or attentional skills, that undermine their ability to sit and learn on demand. But the good news is that these learning capacities can be trained through scientifically designed education technology.

This workshop will review the newest research on how the brain learns and those issues, unrelated to intelligence, that can affect learning capacity and achievement. The focus of the workshop will be to cover new innovative educational-technology approaches that augment the effectiveness of direct instruction by increasing executive functions and learning capacities in students who struggle to learn: children from low SES backgrounds; children with Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES); English Language Learners (ELLs); and children with diagnosed learning disabilities like dyslexia. The course will be practical and address best practices for selection and utilization of educational technology to buttress and augment direct classroom instruction to maximize the achievement of all of our students.

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COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Recognize underlying learning capacity issues affecting some students ability to benefit from instruction
  2. Apply new educational neuroscience research to improve classroom instructional methodology
  3. Apply neuroscience research to select well designed and evidence-based technological approaches to enhance learning among students struggling to achieve
  4. Determine which technological approach is  most appropriate for each student

COURSE OUTLINE:

Brain organization and maturation – how the brain sets itself up to learn and changes with experience

  • The human brain – an experience-dependent organ
  • Early maturation: Proliferation, pruning, consolidation of specific cognitive systems

Effects of experience on brain maturation

  • Low SES
  • ACES
  • Second Language Learning
  • Genetics
  • Learning disabilities

Neuroscience of Education

  • How teachers change brains
    1. The ‘What’ of teaching – New connections, enhanced myelination
    2. The ‘How’ of teaching – Neurochemical changes associated with attention and motivation
  • How learning capacities of Attention, Memory and Executive Functions are enhanced through:
    1. Educational classroom practices
    2. Neuroscience-based technological approaches
  • Best practices for selection and use of neuroscience technology
    1. What to look for in well-designed neuroscience technology
    2. How to use Ed-Tech to augment direct instruction
    3. How to use Ed-Tech to build learning capacities and executive functions
    4. Demonstrations of available technology for:
      1. ADHD
      2. Effects of Poverty and ACES
      3. Executive Function Disorders
      4. Social-Emotional Learning
Martha S. Burns, Ph.D.

Martha S. Burns, Ph.D., has been a practicing speech language pathologist in the Chicago area for over 40 years. She serves on the Faculty of Northwestern University, department of communication sciences and disorders, and has been a consultant to The Rehabilitation…

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Registration & Fees

Registration Early bird Fee Regular Fee
Super Earlybird Individual 3 Day Enrollment $559
Super Earlybird Deadline is January 19, 2019
Individual 1 Day Enrollment $229 $249
Individual 2 Day Enrollment $409 $429
Individual 3 Day Enrollment $599 $619
Group 3-7 $579 $599
Group 8-14 $559 $579
Group 15+ $539 $559
Full-Time Student $539 $559
The Super Earlybird Deadline is January 19, 2019

For more information on Student Rates, click here

For more information on Group Rates, click here

Afternoon Concurrent Sessions: no pre-registration required. For more information, click here

PLEASE NOTE: Multi-day registrations can NOT be shared. All registration fees are per person. Different individuals cannot be sent on different days under one registration fee. Name badges will be checked at the door.

Fees do not include applicable taxes (13% HST).

Early bird cutoff date: April 16, 2019
To receive the early bird rate, registration and payment must be received by Tuesday, April 16, 2019.


Please review our Registration Terms and Conditions for information on our cancellation policy, payment policies, rebates, and more. You must agree to our Terms and Conditions to register for a workshop or conference.


Register Online     Register your Group



Recommended Accommodation

Sheraton Toronto Airport Hotel & Conference Centre

801 Dixon Rd
Toronto, ON
M9W 1J5

phone:  416.675.6100

 Full map & directions


Our rates:

April 26 – May 4, 2019

Single Rate – $199
Double Rate – $199
Triple Rate – $219
Quad Rate – $239

Release Date: March 29, 2019

To Book Online: https://www.starwoodmeeting.com/Book/JD29AA

To Book by Telephone: 1.866.932.7058 using the group code “Jack Hirose & Associates”



When booking hotel rooms, ask for the Jack Hirose and Associates corporate rate. To receive our corporate rate, rooms must be booked one month prior to the workshop date. Please keep in mind hotel rates may fluctuate.


Continuing Education Credits

Please check back closer to the conference date for more information.